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Posts Tagged ‘exhibitions’

brazza2500

A new exhibition in New York City on the Italian-born, French “explorer,” Pietro Savorgnan di Brazza as a ‘good’ colonialist in contrast to Henry Stanley, because Brazza worked for the French. In 2009.

Link.

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ligon7

The Bronx, NY, artist Glenn Ligon (b. 1960) ‘s work “Gold Nobody Knew Me #1” (2007) from the Rubell Family Collection’s exhibition “30 Americans” now showing in Miami till the end of 2009 (featuring a group of American artists–all black–including Barkley Hendricks, Carrie Mae Weems, Noah Davis, Hank Willis Thomas, Kehinde Wiley, Renee Green and Nick Cave). You can view the full list of participating artists and their works online.

An interesting footnote is that the show was curated by the (white) South African-born curator Mark Coetzee (he is key to Kehinde Wiley securing a contract to work with Puma designing 2010 World Cup-themed sneakers).

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“The BBC’s Mohammed Allie talks to photographer Araminta de Clermont and the subjects of her recent exhibition – former South African prisoners, whose tattoo-covered bodies reveal the story of life inside and its gang culture.”

tattoos

View and listen here.

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This exhibition of the work of the acclaimed painter Marlene Dumas, the first of its scale to be mounted in the United States, is organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, in association with The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition includes approximately seventy paintings and thirty-five drawings, providing a comprehensive examination of the work of one of the most thought-provoking and fascinating artists working today. The exhibition opens with Dumas’s earliest mature works from the late 1970s. While loosely chronological, it will also reflect Dumas’s tendency to work in series, with key paintings grouped together. Through her focus on the human figure, Dumas merges themes of race, sexuality, and social identity with personal experience and art-historical antecedents to create a unique perspective on important and controversial issues of the day. The exhibition provides an opportunity to trace these themes over the course of the artist’s career, and also provides access to paintings and drawings of extraordinary technical quality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.

[Source]

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Full information here.

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Original reference.

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New York Times critic Holland Cotter was more emphatic about ‘Flow,’ a group show of artwork by a loosely defined group of artists under the age of 40 who were either born in Africa or whose parents emigrated from there (with few exceptions, most of the artists live in Europe or North America), on show at the Studio Museum. See Cotter’s review here). Cotter identified the group of artists by the fashionable appellation ‘Afropolitans’ (some of the artists include Mustafa Maluka, Lolo Veleko, Michèle Magema, Latifa Echakhch, and Trokon Nagbe among others). In a separate review, that I just came across, Alan Gilbert, a Village Voice art critic, is less sure about the show’s coherence, whether for the art, artists, curators or critics. See Gilbert’s review here. Flow ends June 29.

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