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Archive for the ‘film’ Category

A few weeks ago (at a screening arranged by the International Documentary Foundation) I saw “Rough Aunties,” a film by director Kim Longinotto about a group of women in Durban, South Africa, who work with police to apprehend child rapists and molesters, as well as run a home for abused and molested women.  The women, a mix of white middle class and black working class women, also make up a family of sorts. The film can be intense at moments (at one point I left the theater to take a break). There’s a lot of violence in the film.

In his review of the film, David Poland of Hot Blog describes the film as “emotionally over-powering.” (He also speculates on what the Hollywood remake would look like.)

I really liked the film and hopes it gets a wider airing.

In the clips below, you can see the aunties at work.

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While making the documentary, “African Underground: Democracy in Dakar,” which “… explores the transformative role of hip-hop on politics in Senegal, West Africa during the February 2007 presidential election campaign,” the filmmakers posted segments on the internet. That’s the first web episode above.

If you liked that, next week the full documentary–now complete–will be screened (Thursday, 23 June) at at The 92nd Y on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

Meanwhile you can watch the web episodes here.

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Exactly one year from today, the World Cup kicks off in South Africa.  So its a good time to post about football. Good time to talk about football and film.

One of the teams trying to make it for South Africa 2010 is France. They currently lie second in their group in the European qualifiers for the tournament.  Serbia looks set to take top spot in group play with France having to enter a knockout competition for 2010. In 1998 the French were in a worse position, but won the final of the tournament in Paris against a lackluster Brazil in Paris. (You can watch the goals–including two by Zinedine Zidane–in the video above.)

If you’re in New York City, you can relive that 1998 campaign on screen in the documentary “Les Yeux Dans Les Bleus” (The Year of the Blues), which will be shown as part of the inaugural edition of “Kicking and Screening,” a film festival about football in New York City next month.

The other films are “Once in a Lifetime: The extraordinary story of the New York Cosmos,” “FC Barcelona Confidential,” and “In the Hands of the Gods.”

The festival also includes a panel discussion about David Beckham’s impact on soccer in the United States.

More detail here.

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The trailer for “Prodigal Son,” a film by Kurt Orderson, a South African director, who sets out to retrace his great-grandfather’s journey from Barbados (he was a merchant sailor ) to Cape Town at the beginning of the 20th century and in that way pointing to the mashed-up identities of the country’s coloured population.

I saw the film earlier this year and hopes it gets more exposure (it got into the 2009 edition of the New York African Film Festival).

Here is a review of the film.

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pope

Searing 23-minute film, “Not Yet Rain,” about attempts to ensure safe abortions in Ethiopia, where thousands of women die each year from pregnancy-related complications. Despite the fact that Ethiopia passed a far-reaching abortion law in 2006, safe abortions are still unattainable in most cases.

The film is directed by Brooklyn-based Lisa Russell. (The film was funded by IPAS, a Chapel Hill-based organization “… that works around the world to increase women’s ability to exercise their sexual and reproductive rights, and to reduce abortion-related deaths and injuries.”

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Inja” (Dog), a short film by South African-Australian director Steve Pasvolsky, about a relationship between a dog and two men–a white farmer and a black farmhand in South Africa. (The film won the award for Best Short Film at the American Academy Award in 2003.)

Worth the 17 minutes.

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